New Laws for Grammar Schools

All grammar school students were compelled to study Latin and about half of those who attended were girls. This made a higher number in attendance than there otherwise might have been and hence, more grant [money was available]. It appeared as if girls in the grammar schools of the whole province were being forced to study Latin for the purpose of drawing more grant [money].

Rev. E. Ryerson[1], Chief Superintendent of Education for Ontario, came forward with the answer to that problem. He stated that as far as he was concerned girls education ended at grammar school. In fact there were to be no grants given for girls attending those schools. There were liberal grants given for boys wishing to attend the Universities, Colleges and high schools. The education of girls appeared to have been looked upon by the government as a necessary nuisance.

The school board in Oshawa in 1867 found itself with the problem of too much money and what to do with it owing to the higher attendance of girls in the grammar school here; there was a surplus of money. A government grant of $1000 had been received; this was on the basis of attendance for the year.  Five hundred dollars was also received from the municipality. There was also $350 from the students’ fees, making a total of $1850. After the headmaster and his assistant were paid, there was a balance of $500. After several meetings of the school trustees the money could still not be spent. There were only a limited number of ways in which it could be used. Common school teachers were in great need and also more space but the money could not be used for those purposes. It will be remembered, that the board is a union and though they sit at the same table and deal with the school as a whole, yet after all, the grammar and common schools are as distinct as if managed by separate corporations. The board finally did provide teachers for the humanities with the grant surplus. Such a dilemma was not likely to befall the school trustees again after the passing of that last school act.

The fees for the grammar school students were lowered somewhat. They were $3.00 per term and for those studying Latin only, they were $1.00 per term. This included higher English. Greek was optional. The students in the common school division were not required to pay fees.

As time went on Mr. McCabe[2] built up the grammar school attendance to the extent that enough money from the grants was being paid to make it self-supporting. This would have been without the help of any fees from girl students. The trustees then decided that all students were to attend free of charge. There was scarcely another school in the province in a position to do this, so it was reported. However, later, the attendance became lee[3] and fees had to be imposed again.

Those wishing to fit themselves for teachers to receive practise training in the junior grades, [did so] under the supervision of Mr. McCabe. His work as a teacher was rated as excellent.

In spite of Rev. Ryerson’s decree the general opinion in Oshawa was that the education of girls should be equal to that of boys. Every facility was provided for the senior girls in the school at the time. A proficient teacher in languages was hired as assistant. There were six teachers, then, in the whole school and a music teacher.

Mr. McCabe established physical training in the school as soon as it was re-built. This comprised physical gymnasium, vocal gymnasium and military drill. Mr. McCabe was president of the Teachers’ Association for the county 1867 – 1868. It was during this time that the discussions, concerning the education of girls and the establishment of scholarships, were taking place.

As was customary in the past Mr. McCabe was sent out by the school trustees to interview any teachers for replacements on the staff.

He was instrumental in establishing a library of 750 books; more were to be added yearly of the recent publications of the time. A reading room was also fitted up “where people could read the daily news from all quarters and the best periodicals.” No doubt the “Vindicator” was one of them found there, in the rooms. I might mention that before this time the only library here was the one operated by the school. Out of the original 600 books bought in 1854; by the year 1857 many of those had been lost and of those left, some were in bad shape. A total of 450 had been salvaged by the committee appointed to do this work, and other had been added. A librarian was hired by the school board and books were being lent out to the public.

Mr. McCabe resigned July 31st 1869. He was receiving a salary of $1000 at the time. He went to Rochester, U.S.A. “as general agent and manager of a prominent Life Insurance Company, for the principal part of the state of New York and Ohio.” Later he worked his way up to a job, in this field, for $5000 per year, a big salary for those days.

Just before Mr. McCabe left, an evening in his honour was planned in the town hall. The place was filled to capacity with not even standing room at the back. He was presented with addresses from the board of Education, the Mechanics Institute and his pupils, in the Union school. He was also given “a magnificent gold chain valued at $150 greenbacks.

The following is the children’s address. It was read by Louisa McGill and she presented the chain. “Esteemed and respected teacher,

We your former pupils of the Oshawa Union School, take this opportunity of expressing our sincere and heartfelt regret at the near approach of your departure from us.

In your separation from us we feel that we lose a kind friend and able teacher, and a wise councillor, who has always been ready to unravel the difficulties that beset our way up the “hill of science and who by his forbearance with our weakness and zeal for improvement has rendered the ascent, thus far, a comparatively easy task. As a tangible mark of our esteem we respectfully ask your acceptance of this chain and may it serve to remind you of our gratitude to you for your uniform kindness and forbearance ever manifested towards us, and for your able and persevering efforts to foster in us habits of independent thought to develop our minds and to store them with useful knowledge to enable us to battle successfully in this age of competition, with the realities of afterlife.

And now in “farewell” to you we earnestly hope that wherever your lot may be cast in the future and in whatever avocation you may be engaged, that the same prosperity and success that had crowned your efforts here may attend you elsewhere, and may heaven’s choicest blessings rest upon you through life and should we “meet no more” on earth may we meet “where the weary are forever at rest” is the earnest prayer of your affectionate pupils.

Signed on behalf of the school –

            Louisa McGill

            Hannah Farewell

            Sara Jane Hislop

            Solomon McGill

            Alfred Farewell

            George Bartlett

Mr. McCabe made suitable replies to the honours bestowed upon him.

The band was present for the evening and there was singing in the intervals between the addresses, of appropriate songs such as: “When Shall We meet again” “Remember Me” and the “Farewell” sung by a number of girls. The whole demonstration passed off so pleasantly, that in the eyes of the recipient “it must have added largely to the honours that were given him.”

Miss Sara Jane Hislop was a sister of the late Miss Fanny Hislop. She was the elder of the two. George Bartlett was the eldest member of the Bartlett family[4]. Their home was on Kingston Road about half way between Stevenson Road and Thornton Road. The old homestead is still there though altered somewhat. Mr. Bartlett went to British Columbia when quite a young man and spent the remainder of his lifetime there. Louisa and Solomon McGill were the daughter and son of Dr. McGill. The two Farewells’ mentioned were members of the Farewell family in Harmony[5].


[1] Having gained a reputation as a man of proven political wisdom and administrative skill, Egerton Ryerson was asked by Governor-General Sir Charles Metcalfe to become Chief Superintendent of Education for Upper Canada in 1844. Ryerson’s first goal was to draft a blueprint for the establishment of a new educational system for Upper Canada. After an extensive study of models in Europe and the United States, he submitted a landmark report which culminated in the passing, in 1846, of the first of three School Acts which would revolutionize education in Canada and lay the groundwork for the school system as we know it today.

[2] Mr. McCabe had other activities in Oshawa as well as the schools. He was second master of the Lebanon Lodge No. 139. He also was one of the originators of the Mechanic’s Institute in Oshawa and was president for a time during his stay here.

[3] Perhaps the author means lax?

[4] Unsure as to who exactly his parents were.

[5] Hannah was the daughter of Cornwall Farewell and granddaughter of William Fulton Farewell

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-CA
X-NONE
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:12.0pt;
font-family:”Georgia”,”serif”;
mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-bidi-theme-font:major-bidi;
mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}

All grammar school students were compelled to study Latin and about half of those who attended were girls. This made a higher number in attendance than there otherwise might have been and hence, more grant [money was available]. It appeared as if girls in the grammar schools of the whole province were being forced to study Latin for the purpose of drawing more grant [money].

            Rev. E. Ryerson[1], Chief Superintendent of Education for Ontario, came forward with the answer to that problem. He stated that as far as he was concerned girls                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        education ended at grammar school. In fact there were to be no grants given for girls attending those schools. There were liberal grants given for boys wishing to attend the Universities, Colleges and high schools. The education of girls appeared to have been looked upon by the government as a necessary nuisance.

            The school board in Oshawa in 1867 found itself with the problem of too much money and what to do with it owing to the higher attendance of girls in the grammar school here; there was a surplus of money. A government grant of $1000 had been received; this was on the basis of attendance for the year.  Five hundred dollars was also received from the municipality. There was also $350 from the students’ fees, making a total of $1850. After the headmaster and his assistant were paid, there was a


 

balance of $500. After several meetings of the school trustees the money could still not be spent. There were only a limited number of ways in which it could be used. Common school teachers were in great need and also more space but the money could not be used for those purposes. It will be remembered, that the board is a union and though they sit at the same table and deal with the school as a whole, yet after all, the grammar and common schools are as distinct as if managed by separate corporations. The board finally did provide teachers for the humanities with the grant surplus. Such a dilemma was not likely to befall the school trustees again after the passing of that last school act.

            The fees for the grammar school students were lowered somewhat. They were $3.00 per term and for those studying Latin only, they were $1.00 per term. This included higher English. Greek was optional. The students in the common school division were not required to pay fees.

            As time went on Mr. McCabe[2] built up the grammar school attendance to the extent that enough money from the grants was being paid to make it self-supporting. This would have been without the help of any fees from girl students. The trustees then decided that all students were to attend free of charge. There was scarcely another school in the province in a position to do this, so it was reported. However, later, the attendance became lee[3] and fees had to be imposed again.

            Those wishing to fit themselves for teachers to receive practise training in the junior grades, [did so] under the supervision of Mr. McCabe. His work as a teacher was rated as excellent.

           

 

In spite of Rev. Ryerson’s decree the general opinion in Oshawa was that the education of girls should be equal to that of boys. Every facility was provided for the senior girls in the school at the time. A proficient teacher in languages was hired as assistant. There were six teachers, then, in the whole school and a music teacher.

            Mr. McCabe established physical training in the school as soon as it was re-built. This comprised physical gymnasium, vocal gymnasium and military drill. Mr. McCabe was president of the Teachers’ Association for the county 1867 – 1868. It was during this time that the discussions, concerning the education of girls and the establishment of scholarships, were taking place.

            As was customary in the past Mr. McCabe was sent out by the school trustees to interview any teachers for replacements on the staff.

            He was instrumental in establishing a library of 750 books; more were to be added yearly of the recent publications of the time. A reading room was also fitted up “where people could read the daily news from all quarters and the best periodicals.” No doubt the “Vindicator” was one of them found there, in the rooms. I might mention that before this time the only library here was the one operated by the school. Out of the original 600 books bought in 1854; by the year 1857 many of those had been lost and of those left, some were in bad shape. A total of 450 had been salvaged by the committee appointed to do this work, and other had been added. A librarian was hired by the school board and books were being lent out to the public.

           

Mr. McCabe resigned July 31st 1869. He was receiving a salary of $1000 at the time. He went to Rochester, U.S.A. “as general agent and manager of a prominent Life Insurance Company, for the principal part of the state of New York and Ohio.” Later he worked his way up to a job, in this field, for $5000 per year, a big salary for those days.

            Just before Mr. McCabe left, an evening in his honour was planned in the town hall. The place was filled to capacity with not even standing room at the back. He was presented with addresses from the board of Education, the Mechanics Institute and his pupils, in the Union school. He was also given “a magnificent gold chain valued at $150 greenbacks.

            The following is the children’s address. It was read by Louisa McGill and she presented the chain. “Esteemed and respected teacher,

We your former pupils of the Oshawa Union School, take this opportunity of expressing our sincere and heartfelt regret at the near approach of your departure from us.

            In your separation from us we feel that we lose a kind friend and able teacher, and a wise councillor, who has always been ready to unravel the difficulties that beset our way up the “hill of science and who by his forbearance with our weakness and zeal for improvement has rendered the ascent, thus far, a comparatively easy task. As a tangible mark of our esteem we respectfully ask your acceptance of this chain and may it serve to remind you of our gratitude to you for your uniform kindness and forbearance ever manifested towards us, and for your able and persevering efforts to foster in us habits of independent thought to develop our minds and to store them with useful knowledge to enable us to battle successfully in this age of competition, with the realities of afterlife.

            And now in “farewell” to you we earnestly hope that wherever your lot may be cast in the future and in whatever avocation you may be engaged, that the same prosperity and success that had crowned your efforts here may attend you elsewhere, and may heaven’s choicest blessings rest upon you through life and should we “meet no more” on earth may we meet “where the weary are forever at rest” is the earnest prayer of your affectionate pupils.

                        Signed on behalf of the school –

            Louisa McGill

            Hannah Farewell

            Sara Jane Hislop

            Solomon McGill

            Alfred Farewell

            George Bartlett

 

Mr. McCabe made suitable replies to the honours bestowed upon him.

            The band was present for the evening and there was singing in the intervals between the addresses, of appropriate songs such as: “When Shall We meet again” “Remember Me” and the “Farewell” sung by a number of girls. The whole demonstration passed off so pleasantly, that in the eyes of the recipient “it must have added largely to the honours that were given him.”

            Miss Sara Jane Hislop was a sister of the late Miss Fanny Hislop. She was the elder of the two. George Bartlett was the eldest member of the Bartlett family[4]. Their home was on Kingston Road about half way between Stevenson Road and Thornton Road. The old homestead is still there though altered somewhat. Mr. Bartlett went to British Columbia when quite a young man and spent the remainder of his lifetime there. Louisa and Solomon McGill were the daughter and son of Dr. McGill. The two Farewells’ mentioned were members of the Farewell family in Harmony[5].


 


[1] Having gained a reputation as a man of proven political wisdom and administrative skill, Egerton Ryerson was asked by Governor-General Sir Charles Metcalfe to become Chief Superintendent of Education for Upper Canada in 1844. Ryerson’s first goal was to draft a blueprint for the establishment of a new educational system for Upper Canada. After an extensive study of models in Europe and the United States, he submitted a landmark report which culminated in the passing, in 1846, of the first of three School Acts which would revolutionize education in Canada and lay the groundwork for the school system as we know it today.

[2] Mr. McCabe had other activities in Oshawa as well as the schools. He was second master of the Lebanon Lodge No. 139. He also was one of the originators of the Mechanic’s Institute in Oshawa and was president for a time during his stay here.

[3]Perhaps the author means lax?

[4]Unsure as to who exactly his parents were.

[5]Hannah was the daughter of Cornwall Farewell and granddaughter of William Fulton Farewell

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Schools

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s